The eGauge hardware (including models in the eGauge2, EG30xx, and EG4xxx model lines) have a variety of database configuration options. Database options are denoted by the number of available registers (either 16 or 64). You can determine the database you are using by viewing the number of registers in Settings -> Installation. Installers can also view the database configuration of registered devices through eGuard. The eGauge records data in a circular database; when it is full, the oldest data point is dropped to make room for the newest (incoming) data point. 


Register header on the Installation page of a 16 register device


EG4xxx hardware


By default, all EG4xxx hardware comes with the 64 register database option. Data is stored as follows:


64 Register database

  • 1 hour second-granular data
  • 1 year minute-granular data
  • 10 years 15 minute-granular data

When there is over one year of data, the oldest minute-granular values are compressed 15 minute-granular intervals to make room for the newest minute-granular values to be written.


eGauge2 and EG30xx hardware


All eGauge2 and EG30xx devices have the most recent 10 minutes of second-by-second data stored in volatile memory (reboot or power cycle will clear the 10-minute history).


16 Register database

  • 1 year minute-granular data
  • 30 years 15-minute-granular data

When there is over one year of data on the 16 register device, the oldest minute-granular values are compressed to 15 minute-granular intervals to make room for the newest minute-granular values to be written.


64 Register database

  • 1 year minute-granular data
  • 6 years hour-granular data

When there is over one year of data on the 64 register device, the oldest minute-granular values are compressed to hour-granular intervals to make room for the newest minute-granular values to be written.


NOTE

Some devices may have special ordered databases not listed here. Contact your purchaser. Capacity and granularity is based on the number of possible registers, not the number of registers in use. This means a 64 register database will always hold 6 years of hour granular data, regardless of the number of registers actually in use.